You want to bring the best of remote learning to your students. But, where do you find the budget?

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Remote learning, in some capacity, is here to stay. Throughout pandemic closures, schools and districts discovered the unique opportunities that in-person learning could not offer. Students in New York could take virtual trips to Alaska, learners in rural communities could have access to multiple world languages through partnerships with Outschool, and more.

It can be challenging to decipher the details of the many grants, waivers, and funds available to schools and districts. Good news! This page helps education leaders make sense of some of the information in an easy-to-digest format, so you can get the funding your school or district deserves. This list is not exhaustive and we know schools are getting very creative in funding programming. If something is missing, let us know using the form below.

How can existing funding streams be used for remote learning?

Title I-A: 
  • Technology (schoolwide) 
  • Technology professional development for all teachers
Title I-A targeted assistance program: Technology for at-risk students and families; technology-related professional development for teachers of at-risk students
Title II-A: Technology professional development
Title III: Technology for English Language Learners
Title IV-A: Digital devices, internet connectivity/virtual private networks (VPNs), and content management systems for students and teachers
IDEA: Special education and related services for students with disabilities, which may include assistive technology devices
Perkins funds: Digital devices for career and technical education (CTE) programs as a supplement to technology purchased for all students by the LEA

Other Potential Sources

The Elementary and Secondary School Emergency Relief Fund (ESSER)

Who gets it?

Part of the CARES act, the majority (90%) of each state’s funds goes to schools and districts that have received Title I, Part A funds that year. All schools can apply to receive money from the remaining 10% of funds.

How?

ESSER funds are distributed by state education agencies (SEAs) to local education agencies (LEAs).

Use by when?

The most recent funds should be used by September 30, 2023.

For what?

The first ESSER funds could be used towards education technology, hardware, or software. The most recent ESSER funds can also be used to address learning loss.

The Governor's Emergency Education Relief Fund (GEER)

Who gets it?

Part of the CARES act, GEER funds are distributed to states with approved applications, with some of the money specifically earmarked for private schools.

How?

LEAs apply for GEER funds through their Governor’s office.

Use by when?

Early GEER funds must be spent by September 30, 2022, while later subgrants must be spent by September 30, 2023.

For what?

GEER funds can be used broadly by school districts to purchase education technology.

Elementary and Secondary Education Act Waivers (ESSA)

Who gets it?

Schools already receiving funds can take advantage of certain limitations the Department of Education has waived.

How?

In addition to taking advantage of waivers, districts can also apply for microgrants that come out of Title I funds.

Use by when?

n/a

For what?

Waivers free up more Title IV money to be spent on educational technology infrastructure, including hardware. The waivers also allow schools to transfer TItle I and II funds to Title IV.

Are you tapping funding streams not listed?

Let us know and we'll add them to this resource

THE FUTURE OF REMOTE LEARNING

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Schools around the country are bringing Outschool with them as they plan for the future of remote learning. Outschool offers 100,000+ live, online elective courses so schools can expand their program and harness student interest cost-effectively. Request a demo of Outschool today.